TIGER EYES BOOK

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Tiger Eyes is a young adult novel written by Judy Blume in about a year- old girl attempting to cope with the unexpected death of her father. In , the. Tiger Eyes book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Davey has never felt so alone in her life. Her father is dead (shot i. Parents need to know that Judy Blume's young-adult novel Tiger Eyes focuses on a family's struggle to recover emotionally after a family member is murdered by.


Tiger Eyes Book

Author:TONITA STANGEL
Language:English, Dutch, Portuguese
Country:Japan
Genre:Personal Growth
Pages:182
Published (Last):19.03.2016
ISBN:375-9-18472-915-2
ePub File Size:21.31 MB
PDF File Size:16.45 MB
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Judy Blume spent her childhood in Elizabeth, New Jersey, making up stories inside her head. She has spent her adult years in many places, doing the same. Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume has been reviewed by Focus on the Family's marriage and parenting He calls himself Wolf, and she tells him to call her Tiger. Davey has never felt so alone in her life. Her father is dead—shot in a holdup— and now her mother is moving the family to New Mexico to try.

Davey calls herself Tiger when they introduce each other. She also becomes a candy striper at the hospital with her new friend, Jane, and meets a cancer patient who turns out to be Wolf's father. The inspiration from Wolf and his father changes Davey for the better. Sadly, he eventually dies from cancer, and Wolf leaves. Another story is Jane's alcoholism and Davey's desire to help her get sober. Also, in three different parts Davey describes the evening her father was shot and killed, which causes her in the beginning of the book to completely freak out when Jason experiences a nosebleed from the altitude.

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She carries a paper bag with her, which is revealed to contain the clothing she was wearing when she found her father and held him until he died; the clothing was soaked with his blood.

After a session with Miriam, she finally breaks down and is able to mourn her father. She eventually buries the clothing and a bread knife she carried for self-defense in a cave in the canyon where she met Wolf.

Eventually, against Bitsy's wishes, Gwen decides to return the family to Atlantic City to begin a new life. Walter helps them download a car for the trip home.

Gwen gets a job in one of the hotels, thanks to the credentials she gained while working at the lab, and with the aid of her friend, Audrey.

Once they're back home, Davey often wonders if anyone will know how much she had changed, but realizes some changes happen deep down and only you know about them.

Judy Blume states in her book Places I Never Meant to Be this was the only book she has written she has voluntarily censored.

In the original draft submitted to her editor, the character Davey masturbates while thinking about Wolf. Her editor pointed out the book was likely to be read by many more young readers if the scene was left out. After agonizing over the decision, Blume agreed and removed the passage.

Sadly, he eventually dies from cancer, and Wolf leaves. Another story is Jane's alcoholism and Davey's desire to help her get sober.

Also, in three different parts Davey describes the evening her father was shot and killed, which causes her in the beginning of the book to completely freak out when Jason experiences a nosebleed from the altitude.

She carries a paper bag with her, which is revealed to contain the clothing she was wearing when she found her father and held him until he died; the clothing was soaked with his blood.

After a session with Miriam, she finally breaks down and is able to mourn her father. She eventually buries the clothing and a bread knife she carried for self-defense in a cave in the canyon where she met Wolf. Eventually, against Bitsy's wishes, Gwen decides to return the family to Atlantic City to begin a new life.

Walter helps them download a car for the trip home.

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Gwen gets a job in one of the hotels, thanks to the credentials she gained while working at the lab, and with the aid of her friend, Audrey. Christian Beliefs Jane's family goes to church. Jane, hung over, begs Davey to go with them one Sunday. Davey says there are many churches in Los Alamos. Davey, noticing all the churches in this scientific community, wonders if scientists pray more than others because they have more guilt and fear.

She says she read in Time magazine that organized religion was based on guilt and fear. Davey's parents were both half Jewish. Her family went to a Unitarian Fellowship for a while, then to a temple.

Now, they don't go at all. Davey says dying scares her because it's so permanent.

She'd like to think there's an afterlife, but she can't really bring herself to believe it. Authority Roles Walter is a scientist who helps develop weapons.

He and Bitsy are afraid of everything. For every activity Davey wants to try, from skiing to hot air ballooning to taking drivers ed, Bitsy has a horror story about someone who got hurt doing it.

Walter says Davey's dad had a wasted life because he worked at a store and never got an education. Though they are overprotective and opinionated, Walter and Bitsy do their best to care for Davey's grieving family. As Mom wades through her own trauma and depression, she often angers Davey by deferring to Bitsy and Walter's rules.

Tiger Eyes

Mom recognizes the severity of her depression and enters counseling. She ultimately turns down a marriage proposal in Los Alamos so she and the kids can return home and face their fears.

The Lord's name is taken in vain a handful of times. When Davey finally starts processing her feelings from the night of Dad's death, she talks about the blood splattered everywhere at the scene of the shooting. Davey remembers making out with a boy the night Dad died.

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After Davey passes out at school, the nurse grills her about whether she's having her period, taking drugs or drinking. She asks if there's any chance Davey is pregnant. When Davey first sees Wolf, she worries that he could be a rapist or junkie. Davey later imagines living in a cave with Wolf and making love on the rocks in the canyon. She wonders if a girl at school who tries to befriend her is gay.

When a teacher shows a film and leaves the room unattended, some kids make out. Davey says if anyone flashes her while she's candy striping, she will tell him to "put it away. She also says her parents have sex once a week on Saturday nights. Jane tells Davey she's only kissed two boys, and she learned about sex by looking it up in the library's card catalog.

When she asked her sisters about sex, they told her to ask Mom. Mom told her she was too young to be asking about that.Somehow, the open-endedness in this novel makes it more realistic. Life in Los Alamos is very different from Davey's life in Atlantic City, a brilliant mix of color and class on the edge of the ocean, where no one needs Search and Rescue anymore than they need proper boots to climb down into the canyon.

Lily Anderson. Wolf is attracted to Davey's "tiger eyes," as he calls them. Will she ever stop hurting?

'Tiger Eyes,' Judy Blume, and 'regular kid' lit

Davey drinks Sangria with her mom at a restaurant. Fudge TV series. Davey's aunt and uncle, Bitsy and Walter, have a different lifestyle and attitudes from what Davey's used to, but they're caring and supportive when they're needed. The emotions Blume does choose to tackle, however, are done very well. Testimony from Your Perfect Girl.

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